Sweet Potato Butter

For many Americans, sweet potatoes are a holiday side dish and not much more.  Little do they know that sweet potatoes are one of the healthiest vegetables you can eat.  They are high in fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, and manganese.  They are also a decent source of calcium and iron.

Wait, there’s more.  Stay with me here.  The unassuming sweet potato is also rich in carotenoids, which are anti-inflammatory and help stabilize your blood sugar.  They can also help your metabolism.

source

If they don’t already, sweet potatoes really should make their way to your plate on a regular basis.  They deserve a bigger role than a measly Thanksgiving side dish that appears once a year.

The idea for this sweet potato butter came to me after I made a batch of pumpkin butter for my brother and sister-in-law when we were heading to their house for a birthday party.  I came home and couldn’t believe I didn’t make a double batch so we could have some!

I set out to make another batch of pumpkin butter, but when I saw the sweet potatoes in the pantry, I thought, Why not?

I need to ask myself that question more often.  Good things come from questions like that.  This sweet potato butter is a great example.

I basically used my pumpkin butter recipe, with a few tweaks.  Instead of xylitol, I sweetened it with agave nectar.  You can really use whatever your preferred sweetener is, and you don’t need very much.

The same spices and flavorings that work so well with pumpkin work just as well with sweet potato.  The result was a smooth, spicy, sweet butter that is loaded with nutrients.  This recipe is bound to become a fall staple in my household.  I think you should make it one in yours, too.

Meghan enjoyed this spread on top of a sliced apple…that apparently got cut out of the picture.  The evidence is on her face.   This is a perfect way to add vegetables to your toddler’s snack time.  In case you are wondering, Meghan’s going through a phase where she must be in some sort of dress up costume at all times.  This is her hippy dress.  :-)

Want some more ideas on how to use this versatile and super healthy sweet potato butter?

Check it out:

  • Spread it on sliced apples, bananas, or your favorite fruit.
  • Spread it on toast.
  • Spoon a bit into plain yogurt.
  • Add it to your oatmeal for a warm, fall-themed breakfast.
  • Blend a few tablespoons up with ice, banana, and yogurt and/or milk for a delicious smoothie.

Want more sweet potato recipes?  Try my sweet potato chips, sweet potato enchiladas, or my vegan creamy sweet potato soup.  All great ways to get more of this super star into your diet!

Comments

    • Maryea says

      He loves it! This is what he said about it: “This is really good, but you should call it something other than sweet potato butter. That doesn’t sound appetizing.” :-) Men are funny.

    • Maryea says

      This is a great alternative to traditional jelly. With only a small amount of agave nectar, it’s still sweet. I love it!

  1. says

    I never in a 1000 years would have thought to make sweet potato butter! This looks delicious and I’ll have to give it a whirl this year instead of my normal pumpkin butter.

  2. says

    That looks so yummy (and right up my alley).
    I do have a question about agave nectar. I’ve heard (but not found any actual research) that pregnant women shouldn’t eat agave. Have you heard this? Any thoughts? I have a stash of agave that I’d love to be using- just wanting to know it’s safe!

    • Maryea says

      First, let me say that I’m not an expert and you should always talk to your doctor about any questions you have regarding the safety of different foods. That being said, here’s what Dr. Andrew Weil has to say about agave and pregnant women:

      A 2006 review of the scientific literature on agave published in HerbClip™, on the Web site of the American Botanical Council, concluded that it is safe to use agave in the amounts usually found in foods and beverages, but the reviewers cautioned that pregnant women should avoid it because some species (more than 200 have been identified) contain anordin and dinordin, steroids with contraceptive effects that could lead to miscarriage. I think this is a very low risk. (You can read more here.)

      I have only used it in moderation during my pregnancy. I avoided everything that has even a small question mark in my first trimester, however.

  3. Lindsay says

    This sounds delicious! I have a couple of other recipes that call for apple cider though, and I can never find it. I don’t know if it’s just not really a southern thing or what. Can you think of any substitutions that might work?

  4. says

    So weird. I was actually eating a sweet potato when I sat down and opened my email and saw this post, lol. Yum. This looks like something I’m going to want to can a lot of for this Winter! :)

    • Maryea says

      No, apparently sweet potato and pumpkin butter cannot be canned. (At least that’s what I found in my research) Sorry!

  5. Sylvia Neal says

    I was at Lake Lure, in the N.C. mountains yesterday, and bought a small jar of Sweet Potato Butter, in a gift shop. It is really good. It had to be canned to be on the shelf, for sale. It should be easy to can, with apple cider vinegar added. Just wondering what you found in your research as to not canning it. Thanks.

  6. Sylvia Neal says

    I was at Lake Lure, in the N.C. mountains yesterday, and bought a small jar of Sweet Potato Butter, in a gift shop. It is really good. It had to be canned to be on the shelf, for sale. It should be easy to can, with apple cider vinegar added. Just wondering what you found in your research as to not canning it. Thanks.

  7. Lois Davis says

    I have a recipe for sweet potato butter similar to yours. It is a Pioneer woman recipe.
    It can be canned. However it has apples in it instead of apple cider, however it doesn’t affect the taste. It doesn’t give a shelf life. Mine never last long enough to find out.

  8. Sandy says

    can you water bath process this to put on shelf instead of refrigerating it I bought a pint at a craft show she said it was okay to leave out until I opened then refrigerate.

    • Maryea says

      Yes, I think you could can this recipe. I’m not that familiar though with safety standards of canning, so I’d check with a more reliable source first! :)

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